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Mattie Hatter and the Gilded Gauge

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

It's
Whodunit Wednesday!

Do you like to solve mysteries?
Do you love to win prizes?
If you said yes to both questions,
you're in the right place! 

It's easy.
Read the following story and if you think you know
Whodunit, enter your answer into 
the Rafflecopter form below.

One lucky winner will win a
Surprise!

This giveaway is brought to you by me, 
a poor but happy blogger. ;-)
So, your prize could be a cozy mystery. Or it could be a notepad, magnet, key chain or 
something that's just fun and cute.

This giveaway is open to the US and Canada.

Sound fun?
Well then, get reading!

THE POINTING CORPSE


   When detective business was slow, the great Sherlock Holmes has spent the long, empty hours playing the violin. Sherman Holmes did the same, but with less soothing results. "Maybe I should take lessons," he would think as he sawed back and forth across the strings. When things got really slow, Sherman switched on one of his police band radios. 

   After two boring days of drizzle and inactivity, the detective intercepted a call reporting a murder victim found in a car. Sherman happened to hear this call from the police radio in his classic Bentley and made a quick turn up Canyon Road.

   He arrived to find Gunther Wilson standing beside his patrol car and a white sedan parked beside a panoramic view. The sergeant actually looked glad to see him. "I'm a little out of my depth on this one," he said. "It's a celebrity, Mervin Hightower. Shot at close range. I'm waiting for forensics and a tow truck. On top of being murdered, his car battery is dead."

   The whole city knew Mervin Hightower, a newspaper columnist who specialized in scandalous exposés. Sherman walked around to the driver's side. An arm extended out the partially open window, propped up on the glass edge. The hand was made into a fist, except for the index finger, which was straight and firm with rigor mortis. 

   "He appears to be pointing," Sherman deduced. "How long has the fellow been dead?"

   "What do I look like, a clock? The forensic boys will narrow it down. I saw the car and stopped to see if he needed help, which he doesn't. I recognized him, even with the blood. "

   Sherman looked in to see the columnist's familiar face contorted and frozen in agony. "I presume the man survived for a minute after the attack. What do you think he was pointing at, old bean? Something that could identify his killer?" Sherman lined up his eyes along the extended arm. "What story was he working on?"

   Wilson pulled a newspaper from his back pocket. "Here. In today's column, he says he's going to expose some embezzlement from the City Charity Board."

   There are only three people on the Charity Board," Sherman said, checking the column for their names. "Marilyn Lake, Arthur Curtis, and Tony Pine." Then he examined the view: A glistening lake, a neon sign for Curtis Furniture and a majestic grove of evergreens. "Zounds!" 

   "Zounds is right. If Mervin was trying to point out his killer, he did a lousy job." 

   "Not necessarily." Sherman was thinking. "I think he did just fine."

Who killed Mervin Hightower?

For a bonus entry: How did Sherman know?

The Whodunit Wednesday solution will be posted on tomorrow's blog after the Throwback Thursday feature.

Please, only leave your guesses 
through Rafflecopter. 

As always, please leave a comment and 
let me know what you think!

Follow my blog by clicking on the link in the upper right hand corner of this page. 


GOOD LUCK!

4 comments:

  1. This one was hard. It is still fun though! Thanks for posting these.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well this was a hard one! I made my guess, but a pretty far out one it was LOL!

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  3. This was a hard-too many clues so I'm afraid I fell for a red herring LOL

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  4. Not doing too well in the logic category the last couple weeks! Having fun racking my brain though but still no clue. When I see the answer it will be so obvious!

    ReplyDelete